January 2019 Health Newsletter

Print-Friendly Newsletter

DELRAN CHIROPRACTIC, PA

pic doctorsbysign
   Dr Richard Polino DC, DACNB, FICC
   Dr Jason Polino   DC
   Dr John Sinibaldi DC
         A Holistic Health Care Center
         www.polinowellness.com
         www.delrandiscdr.com

856-461-6262  
3001 Bridgeboro Road

DELRAN, NEW JERSEY, 08075



Current Articles

» ALPHA LIPOIC ACID
» How Chiropractic Care Can Help Relieve “Forward Head Posture”
» Kids Aren’t the Only Ones Who Need Less Screen Time
» Over One-Quarter of the Entire World’s Population Doesn’t Get Enough Exercise

ALPHA LIPOIC ACID
Alpha-Lipoic Acid

What is alpha-lipoic acid? Why do we need it?

Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is an antioxidant manufactured in the body. It is sometimes referred to as the ?universal? antioxidant because, unlike most antioxidants, it is soluble in both fat and water. In addition to being manufactured by the body, it can be found in some foods and supplements (see below).

ALA has several benefits, particularly for people with diabetes. It enhances glucose uptake in people with type-2 diabetes, inhibits the process of glybosylation (in which sugar molecules attach themselves to proteins), and can reduce nerve damage and pain caused by diabetes. Preliminary evidence suggests that ALA can improve visual function in people with glaucoma. Test-tube studies show that ALA can stop the HIV virus from replicating, but whether ALA supplements can help people infected with HIV remains unclear at this point.

How much alpha-lipoic acid should I take?

As of this writing, there is no clear evidence that any particular dose of ALA provides a benefit for any particular condition. In the abovementioned glaucoma study, researchers provided subjects with 150 mg of ALA per day. Other studies typically use between 750 and 800 mg per day. Some practitioners recommend 20-50 mg of alpha-lipoic acid daily to provide general antioxidant protection.

What are some good sources of alpha-lipoic acid? What forms are available?

Small amounts of alpha-lipoic acid are produced naturally by the body. Some red meats ? particularly liver ? are believed to be good sources of ALA; supplements are also available.

What can happen if I don't get enough alpha-lipoic acid? What can happen if I take too much? Are there any side-effects I should be aware of?

Because alpha-lipoic acid is produced naturally in the body, deficiencies are not known to occur in humans. However, for people who take large doses of ALA supplements, some side-effects may occur, including skin rash, and diabetics run the risk of suffering hypoglycemia. Long-term use of alpha-lipoic acid in animals has been shown to interfere with the actions of the vitamin biotin, but research on humans has yet to be conducted.

As always, make sure to consult with a licensed health care provider before you begin taking alpha-lipoic acid or any other herbal remedy or dietary supplement.


References

  • Busse E, Zimmer G, Schorpohl B, et al. Influence of alpha-lipoic acid on intracellular glutathione in vitro and in vivo.Arzneimittelforschung1992;42:829-31.
  • Filina AA, Davydova NG, Endrikhovskii SN, et al. Lipoic acid as a means of metabolic therapy of open-angle glaucoma.Vestn Oftalmol1995;111:6-8.
  • Lykkesfeldt J, Hagen TM, Vinarsky V, et al. Age-associated decline in ascorbic acid concentration, recycling, and biosynthesis in rat hepatocytes - reversal with (R)-alpha-lipoic acid supplementation.FASEB J1998;12:1183-9.
  • Nichols TW Jr. Alpha-lipoic acid: biological effects and clinical implications.Altern Med Rev1997;2:177-83.
  • Packer L, Witt EH, Tritschler HJ. Alpha-lipoic acid as a biological antioxidant.Free Radic Biol Med1995;19:227-50.

Author: Nichols
Source: TYH
Copyright: TYH 1997


page toppage toppage top




How Chiropractic Care Can Help Relieve “Forward Head Posture”

If you spend a lot of time at the computer or looking down at your smartphone, you may be dealing with "forward head posture." Fortunately, this condition can be corrected with the right chiropractic care which often includes therapeutic exercises and stretches. 
What Is Forward Head Posture?
Forward head posture refers to when our head is not positioned properly over the body and is too far forward. This is typically caused by too much screen time in today’s computerized world although spending too much time at a desk or writing by hand, knitting or sewing could also cause an issue over time. Our head should be balanced on the top of our neck. This is often described as how a golf ball sits on top of a tee. The ears should be in line with the shoulders, not in front. The neck has a natural "C" curve when viewed from the side when the head is in the proper position. When the head is too far forward, that natural "C" curve can be reduced or lost increasing the tension on the structures of the neck and upper back. This can cause the upper back to become excessively curved in it's natural reversed "C" shape resulting in a condition called "kyphosis." When forward head posture becomes the norm for your body, it can lead to chronic neck pain, headaches, and spinal disc problems.
The Solution for Forward Head Posture
Fortunately, chiropractic care can significantly help. Additionally, many chiropractors not only utilize chiropractic-specific spinal adjustments to help correct these postural abnormalities, but additionally employ the use of in-office and/or at home therapeutic exercise regimen. If you are suffering from headaches, neck pain, or shoulder pain or discomfort, contact us today for a no-obligation evaluation.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JMPT: July–August, 2018 Volume 41, Issue 6, Pages 530–539.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2019


page toppage toppage top




Kids Aren’t the Only Ones Who Need Less Screen Time

A new doctor-authored resource for parents has some surprising news: Parents should limit their own screen time as well as their kids'. Here's why: Kids often mirror their parents' words and actions. According to Dr. Jenny Radesky, a co-writer of the resource in JAMA Pediatrics, this includes how parents interact with their smartphones – and how often. Dr. Radesky's research on the subject has revealed that parents preoccupied with their phones typically engage in less one-on-one interactions with their children, have more parent-child conflicts, and run into more behavioral issues with their kids. She also cites previous studies on TV-watching and parenting with similar results – parents who watched more television had kids who watched more television. Luckily, the parental resource Radesky co-authored with Dr. Megan Moreno has some suggestions for limiting your screen time and strengthening your family relationships. For instance, they recommend stepping back from your phone in instances where you would usually turn to it for stress-relief, distraction, or to avoid conflict. Instead, try something else, like breathing deeply. Engage with those around you and give them your full attention. The doctors promote establishing specific times when the whole family can unplug and do a single activity together. They also advise avoiding behaviors you wouldn’t want your kids to learn, like looking at your phone while driving your car, or ignoring others while using your phone.  In short, if you want your kids to learn good phone etiquette and safety, model it for them.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JAMA Pediatrics, online August 27, 2018.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2019


page toppage toppage top




Over One-Quarter of the Entire World’s Population Doesn’t Get Enough Exercise

About 1.4 billion people around the globe – about one-quarter of all the adults on earth – aren't getting enough physical activity in their day-to-day lives. According to a study from the World Health Organization, people who don't exercise enough daily are at higher risk for cancer, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, to start. To keep healthy, you need a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate activity or 75 minutes of vigorous, strenuous activity every week. According to the 2016 study, only one-third of women and one-fourth of men were not getting the recommended amounts.  The countries with the highest rates of inactivity were mostly Middle Eastern, including Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and Iraq, as well as American Samoa. Over 50% of adults in these areas were not getting enough physical activity. Meanwhile, 40% of all U.S. adults, 14% of Chinese adults, and 36% of British adults were not active enough. In addition to the high rates of inactivity, the study found that these rates are staying stagnant despite growing research that proves how vital exercise is to health. In fact, inactivity is twice as high in richer countries versus poorer ones, and even increased during the years 2001-2016 by 5%. One big reason may be because sedentary occupations are becoming the norm in richer countries, while poorer countries have more active occupations.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Lancet Glob Health 2018; 6: e1077–86.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2019


page toppage toppage top






Articles 1-4 of 4 << first < previous next > last >