September 2018 Health Newsletter

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DELRAN CHIROPRACTIC, PA

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   Dr Richard Polino DC, DACNB, FICC
   Dr Jason Polino   DC
   Dr John Sinibaldi DC
         A Holistic Health Care Center
         www.polinowellness.com
         www.delrandiscdr.com

856-461-6262  
3001 Bridgeboro Road

DELRAN, NEW JERSEY, 08075



Current Articles

» ALPHA LIPOIC ACID
» Back Pain Sufferers Reduce Disability with Chiropractic Care
» Regular Exercise Is Great for Mental Health – But Watch Out for Too Much

ALPHA LIPOIC ACID
Alpha-Lipoic Acid

What is alpha-lipoic acid? Why do we need it?

Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is an antioxidant manufactured in the body. It is sometimes referred to as the ?universal? antioxidant because, unlike most antioxidants, it is soluble in both fat and water. In addition to being manufactured by the body, it can be found in some foods and supplements (see below).

ALA has several benefits, particularly for people with diabetes. It enhances glucose uptake in people with type-2 diabetes, inhibits the process of glybosylation (in which sugar molecules attach themselves to proteins), and can reduce nerve damage and pain caused by diabetes. Preliminary evidence suggests that ALA can improve visual function in people with glaucoma. Test-tube studies show that ALA can stop the HIV virus from replicating, but whether ALA supplements can help people infected with HIV remains unclear at this point.

How much alpha-lipoic acid should I take?

As of this writing, there is no clear evidence that any particular dose of ALA provides a benefit for any particular condition. In the abovementioned glaucoma study, researchers provided subjects with 150 mg of ALA per day. Other studies typically use between 750 and 800 mg per day. Some practitioners recommend 20-50 mg of alpha-lipoic acid daily to provide general antioxidant protection.

What are some good sources of alpha-lipoic acid? What forms are available?

Small amounts of alpha-lipoic acid are produced naturally by the body. Some red meats ? particularly liver ? are believed to be good sources of ALA; supplements are also available.

What can happen if I don't get enough alpha-lipoic acid? What can happen if I take too much? Are there any side-effects I should be aware of?

Because alpha-lipoic acid is produced naturally in the body, deficiencies are not known to occur in humans. However, for people who take large doses of ALA supplements, some side-effects may occur, including skin rash, and diabetics run the risk of suffering hypoglycemia. Long-term use of alpha-lipoic acid in animals has been shown to interfere with the actions of the vitamin biotin, but research on humans has yet to be conducted.

As always, make sure to consult with a licensed health care provider before you begin taking alpha-lipoic acid or any other herbal remedy or dietary supplement.


References

  • Busse E, Zimmer G, Schorpohl B, et al. Influence of alpha-lipoic acid on intracellular glutathione in vitro and in vivo.Arzneimittelforschung1992;42:829-31.
  • Filina AA, Davydova NG, Endrikhovskii SN, et al. Lipoic acid as a means of metabolic therapy of open-angle glaucoma.Vestn Oftalmol1995;111:6-8.
  • Lykkesfeldt J, Hagen TM, Vinarsky V, et al. Age-associated decline in ascorbic acid concentration, recycling, and biosynthesis in rat hepatocytes - reversal with (R)-alpha-lipoic acid supplementation.FASEB J1998;12:1183-9.
  • Nichols TW Jr. Alpha-lipoic acid: biological effects and clinical implications.Altern Med Rev1997;2:177-83.
  • Packer L, Witt EH, Tritschler HJ. Alpha-lipoic acid as a biological antioxidant.Free Radic Biol Med1995;19:227-50.

Author: Nichols
Source: TYH
Copyright: TYH 1997


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Back Pain Sufferers Reduce Disability with Chiropractic Care

Chiropractic care for back pain has been proven to provide pain relief while improving mobility and function. Now, a recent study provides evidence that chiropractic care can not only reduce back pain but also lessen disability in patients. The study focused on 750 United States military service members still on active duty. All were being treated for lower back pain. Traditional measures such as physical therapy as well as drugs were used.  Then, half of the group were treated by a chiropractor. The chiropractic methods used included spinal manipulation as well as special exercises. In just six weeks, the military service members who received the chiropractic treatments had less back pain and less disability. The research was led by Dr. Christine Goertz of the Palmer College of Chiropractic in Davenport, Iowa. She told Reuters that the treatments may help muscles heal while improving mobility in the body. They may also help manage pain by changing how pain is perceived. Back pain in the lumbar spine (lower back) affects one in five adult Americans. With painkillers such as opioids leading to increasing addictions, safe, natural treatments like chiropractic care are increasingly sought after. If you're suffering from back pain, neck pain, headaches, or joint related pain, contact your local doctor of chiropractic today!

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JAMA Network Open, online May 18, 2018.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2018


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Regular Exercise Is Great for Mental Health – But Watch Out for Too Much

According to a study of 1.2 million adults across the U.S., people who engage in regular exercise report an overall healthier mental state than non-active or sedentary people. However, more exercise is not necessarily better for mental health. According to this research, daily exercisers actually report less mental wellbeing. This means, just like anything else, moderation is key to reap the health benefits of physical activity. And, according to the study, all kinds of exercise counts, including housework, mowing the lawn, caring for children, fishing, gym sessions, running, walking, and more. Researchers have continually proven that exercise can have major positive health effects, including lowered risks for stroke, heart disease, and diabetes. However, the link between good mental health and exercise is less certain. While the researchers in this particular study were able to positively link exercise to healthy mindsets, they weren’t able to demonstrate cause and effect. The study asked adults across the U.S. to give a ballpark estimate of how often during the previous month they would say their mental health was "not good" due to emotional issues, including those related to stress and depression. In addition, these adults reported their exercise habits during the previous month, including how long each session lasted. One major takeaway from the study: People who exercised regularly reported experiencing less mental health issues. In total, the exercisers reported 43% fewer days with mental health issues than non-exercisers.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: The Lancet Psychiatry. Volume 5, Issue 9, P692-693, September 01, 2018.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2018


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