April 2018 Health Newsletter

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DELRAN CHIROPRACTIC, PA

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   Dr Richard Polino DC, DACNB, FICC
   Dr Jason Polino   DC
   Dr John Sinibaldi DC
         A Holistic Health Care Center
         www.polinowellness.com
         www.delrandiscdr.com

856-461-6262  
3001 Bridgeboro Road

DELRAN, NEW JERSEY, 08075



Current Articles

» ALPHA LIPOIC ACID
» Study Findings Show Spinal Manipulation Therapy Effective in Treating Lower Back
» Listening to Your Body – When do You Need a Break?
» Over 40 and Lift Weights? Eat More Protein

ALPHA LIPOIC ACID
Alpha-Lipoic Acid

What is alpha-lipoic acid? Why do we need it?

Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is an antioxidant manufactured in the body. It is sometimes referred to as the ?universal? antioxidant because, unlike most antioxidants, it is soluble in both fat and water. In addition to being manufactured by the body, it can be found in some foods and supplements (see below).

ALA has several benefits, particularly for people with diabetes. It enhances glucose uptake in people with type-2 diabetes, inhibits the process of glybosylation (in which sugar molecules attach themselves to proteins), and can reduce nerve damage and pain caused by diabetes. Preliminary evidence suggests that ALA can improve visual function in people with glaucoma. Test-tube studies show that ALA can stop the HIV virus from replicating, but whether ALA supplements can help people infected with HIV remains unclear at this point.

How much alpha-lipoic acid should I take?

As of this writing, there is no clear evidence that any particular dose of ALA provides a benefit for any particular condition. In the abovementioned glaucoma study, researchers provided subjects with 150 mg of ALA per day. Other studies typically use between 750 and 800 mg per day. Some practitioners recommend 20-50 mg of alpha-lipoic acid daily to provide general antioxidant protection.

What are some good sources of alpha-lipoic acid? What forms are available?

Small amounts of alpha-lipoic acid are produced naturally by the body. Some red meats ? particularly liver ? are believed to be good sources of ALA; supplements are also available.

What can happen if I don't get enough alpha-lipoic acid? What can happen if I take too much? Are there any side-effects I should be aware of?

Because alpha-lipoic acid is produced naturally in the body, deficiencies are not known to occur in humans. However, for people who take large doses of ALA supplements, some side-effects may occur, including skin rash, and diabetics run the risk of suffering hypoglycemia. Long-term use of alpha-lipoic acid in animals has been shown to interfere with the actions of the vitamin biotin, but research on humans has yet to be conducted.

As always, make sure to consult with a licensed health care provider before you begin taking alpha-lipoic acid or any other herbal remedy or dietary supplement.


References

  • Busse E, Zimmer G, Schorpohl B, et al. Influence of alpha-lipoic acid on intracellular glutathione in vitro and in vivo.Arzneimittelforschung1992;42:829-31.
  • Filina AA, Davydova NG, Endrikhovskii SN, et al. Lipoic acid as a means of metabolic therapy of open-angle glaucoma.Vestn Oftalmol1995;111:6-8.
  • Lykkesfeldt J, Hagen TM, Vinarsky V, et al. Age-associated decline in ascorbic acid concentration, recycling, and biosynthesis in rat hepatocytes - reversal with (R)-alpha-lipoic acid supplementation.FASEB J1998;12:1183-9.
  • Nichols TW Jr. Alpha-lipoic acid: biological effects and clinical implications.Altern Med Rev1997;2:177-83.
  • Packer L, Witt EH, Tritschler HJ. Alpha-lipoic acid as a biological antioxidant.Free Radic Biol Med1995;19:227-50.

Author: Nichols
Source: TYH
Copyright: TYH 1997


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Study Findings Show Spinal Manipulation Therapy Effective in Treating Lower Back

The Spine Journal (2018) has just published a study that points to spinal manipulation therapy being the most effective way to treat lower back pain when compared with other methods. The effectiveness and safety of some different mobilization and manipulation therapies were examined. It was concluded definitively that spinal manipulation produces a much more significant effect on the lower back than a mobilization option. Spinal manipulation therapy can be applied appropriately by a Doctor of Chiropractic. Key findings were:

  • 57 percent of patients that took part in the study experienced effective relief of chronic pain occurring in the lower back. 78 percent of the same patients also experienced a reduction in disability. This happened when spinal manipulation therapy was compared to other treatments.
  • When comparing spinal manipulation to the use of physical therapy, 79 percent of these patients reported that spinal manipulation was most effective at relieving symptoms of both pain and disability.
  • It is worth noting here that both mobilization and manipulation therapies tested in this study are considered safe to use as treatments. 

Back pain is more common than you think. In the U.S. alone, 84 percent of the population suffers from some sort of back pain. Within this percentage, roughly 23 percent experience back pain that is chronic, and half again are actually disabled by this severe pain. What are you waiting for? Contact your local chiropractor today and start working with them to find relief from your chronic back pain.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Manip. & Mob…Chronic LBP: A Systematic Review & Meta-Analysis. The Spine Journal
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2018


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Listening to Your Body – When do You Need a Break?

There is such a thing as too much of a good thing. You might see exercise as a great addition to your lifestyle, but you need breaks from your training, too.  Noam Tamir of TS Fitness New York City explains that your body goes through trauma when you exercise.  So how do you know when to take a break?

  • You're constantly sore: delayed onset muscle soreness, or DOMS, is normal. However, you shouldn't feel this all the time. Allow 24-48 hours in between each workout session.
  • You're always tired: moodiness and tiredness are signs of working out too much. This is because cortisol is produced by exercise. Too much of this can take a toll on your mental health.
  • You have an abnormal heart rate: check your heart rate regularly. If your resting heart rate is higher than average, then it's not ready for your next workout session yet.
  • You're always stiff: if you continue to be stiff long after a workout, your body is going to start changing the way it moves naturally. This can become permanent and potentially cause injury.
  • You've got dark yellow pee: looking at the color of your pee is the easiest way to figure out if you're dehydrated or not. The darker your pee, the more water you need to drink. 

Growing Attuned to Your Body for Optimum Health
Because you actually create micro-tears in your muscles when you exercise, they need time to repair, which will help them grow stronger.  The more you exercise, the more you strain your body. If you're not giving your body the breaks it needs, you could be doing more harm than good.  Take a day of rest between workouts and you’ll be stronger, fitter, and happier than ever!

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: https://www.cnn.com/2015/12/15/health/take-rest-day-exercise/index.html
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2018


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Over 40 and Lift Weights? Eat More Protein
The British Journal of Sports Medicine has published a review that definitively points to protein as the building block of more muscle. According to this comprehensive review, people who want to be physically stronger should lift weights and eat more protein. This is especially true for people who are over 40. However, there is a caution in the review, explaining that there is a limit to the benefits that protein has. Through the review, they concluded that any protein works on a similar level of effectiveness. By studying 49 past experiments that reviewed different types of protein in both men's and women's diet correlating with their weightlifting, they concluded that protein plays a big part in building muscle. It was found that men and women who ate protein while weight training developed muscles that were larger and stronger. The statistical results were as follows: 10 percent for strength and 25 percent for muscle mass. The researchers also calculated precisely how much protein intake was needed on a daily basis to achieve these results. The answer was 1.6 grams of protein per kilogram that you weigh. Beyond this specific measurement, more protein did not equal more muscle. However, it is worth noting that this number required for daily protein intake is considerably higher than the regular federal recommendations of 56 grams a day for men and 46 grams for women. While there are still more studies to be done on the correlation between weightlifting and protein intake, it's safe to say that eating a balanced diet including protein will help you gain muscle.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Br J Sports Med. 2018 Mar;52(6):376-384.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2018


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