Newsletter Archives > ChiroPlanet.com Monthly Health Newsletter: February 2014 Health Newsletter

February 2014 Health Newsletter


Current Articles

» Weight Fluctuations & Strategies

» Sugar. How Sweet It Is, Not.
» Jump For Your Adjustment!
» ALPHA LIPOIC ACID

Weight Fluctuations & Strategies


New research indicates it may not be a bad idea to let your eating habits relax during the weekend, so long as itís done in moderation. In fact, long-term weight loss might be more effective if dieters focus more on stricter weekday diets and allow themselves room to cheat somewhat on the weekends - A strategy that researchers say can allow reasonable weekend splurges while not derailing oneís motivation and weight loss efforts.  In this new study, the self-recorded daily weights of 80 adults were evaluated for periods up to 10 months. Data revealed that for the 18 of 80 adults who lost 3% or more of their bodyweight during the weigh-ins, there appeared to be a pattern of weight gain over the weekends and weight loss during the weekdays, with subjects weighing the most on Sunday/Mondays and weighing the least on Fridays. This pattern seemed strongest in those who either lost weight or maintained their bodyweight during the study. In those subjects who gained weight during the study, this pattern was less reflective of their weight changes. Researchers concluded that weight variations between the weekend and weekday are normal and a focus of tightening up oneís dietary habits during the weekdays and loosening them somewhat during the weekend could assist many in achieving their weight loss goals and maintaining a healthy bodyweight longterm.


Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Obesity Facts, online January 31, 2014.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2014


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Sugar. How Sweet It Is, Not.


A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states Americans are eating too much sugar and itís killing us. As the consumption of added sugars rises, so too does oneís risk of dying from heart disease. According to the data, compared with those individuals who got less than 10% of their daily calories from sugar, those with 10-25% of their daily calories coming from sugar were 30% more likely to die of cardiovascular disease and those with more than 25% of their daily calories coming from sugar were twice as likely to die of cardiovascular disease. This becomes even more significant considering that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S. The concern isnít related to the sugars occurring naturally in fruits and vegetables. Instead, itís the added sugars in foods such as sugary drinks and beverages, candy, desserts and other sweetened carbohydrate snacks. In fact, most processed foods we consume have added sugar to make them taste better. So, read the nutritional labels on food packaging and strive to stick to what the American Heart Association recommends: Limiting your daily consumption of added sugars to 150 calories for men and 100 calories for women.


Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JAMA Internal Medicine, online February 3, 2014.

Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2014


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Jump For Your Adjustment!


Looking to increase athletic performance and possibly your vertical jump height? Give an adjustment a try! A small blinded trial was conducted recently in young female athletes who were suffering from ankle joint dysfunction to see if an adjustment to the joint could affect their vertical jump height. The ankle joint, more technically referred to as the talocrural joint, is the joint formed from the ends of the lower leg bones (tibia and fibula) and the top bone of the ankle, the talus. Half of the female athletes with ankle joint dysfunction received an adjustment to their ankle joint once a week for three weeks while the other half received a sham treatment once a week for three weeks. On average, those receiving the adjustment to their ankle joint saw an average 0.47 cm increase in their vertical jump as compared with the sham group. Itís important to recognize that adjustments provided by doctors of chiropractic can be delivered to and benefit more than just the joints of the spine. If you or someone you know is suffering from pain or dysfunction, or is simply looking to enhance their physical performance and overall health, give your local chiropractor a call today!


Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JMPT. February 2014. Vol. 37; Issue 2.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2014


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ALPHA LIPOIC ACID
Alpha-Lipoic Acid

What is alpha-lipoic acid? Why do we need it?

Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is an antioxidant manufactured in the body. It is sometimes referred to as the ?universal? antioxidant because, unlike most antioxidants, it is soluble in both fat and water. In addition to being manufactured by the body, it can be found in some foods and supplements (see below).

ALA has several benefits, particularly for people with diabetes. It enhances glucose uptake in people with type-2 diabetes, inhibits the process of glybosylation (in which sugar molecules attach themselves to proteins), and can reduce nerve damage and pain caused by diabetes. Preliminary evidence suggests that ALA can improve visual function in people with glaucoma. Test-tube studies show that ALA can stop the HIV virus from replicating, but whether ALA supplements can help people infected with HIV remains unclear at this point.

How much alpha-lipoic acid should I take?

As of this writing, there is no clear evidence that any particular dose of ALA provides a benefit for any particular condition. In the abovementioned glaucoma study, researchers provided subjects with 150 mg of ALA per day. Other studies typically use between 750 and 800 mg per day. Some practitioners recommend 20-50 mg of alpha-lipoic acid daily to provide general antioxidant protection.

What are some good sources of alpha-lipoic acid? What forms are available?

Small amounts of alpha-lipoic acid are produced naturally by the body. Some red meats ? particularly liver ? are believed to be good sources of ALA; supplements are also available.

What can happen if I don't get enough alpha-lipoic acid? What can happen if I take too much? Are there any side-effects I should be aware of?

Because alpha-lipoic acid is produced naturally in the body, deficiencies are not known to occur in humans. However, for people who take large doses of ALA supplements, some side-effects may occur, including skin rash, and diabetics run the risk of suffering hypoglycemia. Long-term use of alpha-lipoic acid in animals has been shown to interfere with the actions of the vitamin biotin, but research on humans has yet to be conducted.

As always, make sure to consult with a licensed health care provider before you begin taking alpha-lipoic acid or any other herbal remedy or dietary supplement.


References

  • Busse E, Zimmer G, Schorpohl B, et al. Influence of alpha-lipoic acid on intracellular glutathione in vitro and in vivo.Arzneimittelforschung1992;42:829-31.
  • Filina AA, Davydova NG, Endrikhovskii SN, et al. Lipoic acid as a means of metabolic therapy of open-angle glaucoma.Vestn Oftalmol1995;111:6-8.
  • Lykkesfeldt J, Hagen TM, Vinarsky V, et al. Age-associated decline in ascorbic acid concentration, recycling, and biosynthesis in rat hepatocytes - reversal with (R)-alpha-lipoic acid supplementation.FASEB J1998;12:1183-9.
  • Nichols TW Jr. Alpha-lipoic acid: biological effects and clinical implications.Altern Med Rev1997;2:177-83.
  • Packer L, Witt EH, Tritschler HJ. Alpha-lipoic acid as a biological antioxidant.Free Radic Biol Med1995;19:227-50.

Author: Nichols
Source: TYH
Copyright: TYH 1997


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