Newsletter Archives > ChiroPlanet.com Monthly Health Newsletter: July 2015 Health Newsletter

July 2015 Health Newsletter


Current Articles

» ALPHA LIPOIC ACID
» U.S. Adults Fail To Reach Recommended Amount Of Fruits And Vegetables
» Small Study Determines Aerobic Exercise Is Good For Asthma
» Good News! Chances Are Your Workouts Earn You More Food Than You Thought

ALPHA LIPOIC ACID
Alpha-Lipoic Acid

What is alpha-lipoic acid? Why do we need it?

Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is an antioxidant manufactured in the body. It is sometimes referred to as the ?universal? antioxidant because, unlike most antioxidants, it is soluble in both fat and water. In addition to being manufactured by the body, it can be found in some foods and supplements (see below).

ALA has several benefits, particularly for people with diabetes. It enhances glucose uptake in people with type-2 diabetes, inhibits the process of glybosylation (in which sugar molecules attach themselves to proteins), and can reduce nerve damage and pain caused by diabetes. Preliminary evidence suggests that ALA can improve visual function in people with glaucoma. Test-tube studies show that ALA can stop the HIV virus from replicating, but whether ALA supplements can help people infected with HIV remains unclear at this point.

How much alpha-lipoic acid should I take?

As of this writing, there is no clear evidence that any particular dose of ALA provides a benefit for any particular condition. In the abovementioned glaucoma study, researchers provided subjects with 150 mg of ALA per day. Other studies typically use between 750 and 800 mg per day. Some practitioners recommend 20-50 mg of alpha-lipoic acid daily to provide general antioxidant protection.

What are some good sources of alpha-lipoic acid? What forms are available?

Small amounts of alpha-lipoic acid are produced naturally by the body. Some red meats ? particularly liver ? are believed to be good sources of ALA; supplements are also available.

What can happen if I don't get enough alpha-lipoic acid? What can happen if I take too much? Are there any side-effects I should be aware of?

Because alpha-lipoic acid is produced naturally in the body, deficiencies are not known to occur in humans. However, for people who take large doses of ALA supplements, some side-effects may occur, including skin rash, and diabetics run the risk of suffering hypoglycemia. Long-term use of alpha-lipoic acid in animals has been shown to interfere with the actions of the vitamin biotin, but research on humans has yet to be conducted.

As always, make sure to consult with a licensed health care provider before you begin taking alpha-lipoic acid or any other herbal remedy or dietary supplement.


References

  • Busse E, Zimmer G, Schorpohl B, et al. Influence of alpha-lipoic acid on intracellular glutathione in vitro and in vivo.Arzneimittelforschung1992;42:829-31.
  • Filina AA, Davydova NG, Endrikhovskii SN, et al. Lipoic acid as a means of metabolic therapy of open-angle glaucoma.Vestn Oftalmol1995;111:6-8.
  • Lykkesfeldt J, Hagen TM, Vinarsky V, et al. Age-associated decline in ascorbic acid concentration, recycling, and biosynthesis in rat hepatocytes - reversal with (R)-alpha-lipoic acid supplementation.FASEB J1998;12:1183-9.
  • Nichols TW Jr. Alpha-lipoic acid: biological effects and clinical implications.Altern Med Rev1997;2:177-83.
  • Packer L, Witt EH, Tritschler HJ. Alpha-lipoic acid as a biological antioxidant.Free Radic Biol Med1995;19:227-50.

Author: Nichols
Source: TYH
Copyright: TYH 1997


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U.S. Adults Fail To Reach Recommended Amount Of Fruits And Vegetables

It may not come as a surprise that most adults don't eat the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables each day. Across the nation, less than 15 percent are meeting the recommendations set by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC's new way of studying adults' intake of fruits and vegetables includes examining each state individually instead of getting the national average. Southern states are overwhelming falling short of their recommended daily values. In Tennessee, only seven percent of adults are eating the right amount of fruits, while in Mississippi only 5.5 percent are eating enough vegetables. California comes out on top with 17.7 percent of adults getting enough fruits and 13 percent eating enough vegetables. So how much should adults be really consuming? The Dietary Guidelines of America suggest inactive adults should consume 1.5 to 2 cups of fruits and two to three cups of vegetables each day. The more active a person is, the more they should be increasing these amounts.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: CDC, online July 10, 2015
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2015


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Small Study Determines Aerobic Exercise Is Good For Asthma

With over 235 million people suffering from asthma across the globe, finding new treatment options is a priority in the global healthcare system. A recent, small study has determined that for people who suffer with moderate to severe asthma, aerobic exercise can make it easier for asthma sufferers to manage their asthma. Of the 43 patients who took part in this study, all of them were required to take yoga-breathing classes twice a week, and half were required to walk on a treadmill for 35 minutes twice a week. The study found that the participants that added walking into their routine, in addition to their regular medications they take to treat their asthma, saw a decrease in heightened sensitivity in the airway, as well as inflammation. Asthma sufferers should consult with their doctor prior to implementing an aerobic exercise regimen as that itself could actually lead to an asthma attack. While asthma attacks were not mentioned in the study, Dr. Simon Bacon, who was not a part of the study, says people with asthma may need to use their inhaler before or during their exercise.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Thorax, online June 10, 2015
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2015


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Good News! Chances Are Your Workouts Earn You More Food Than You Thought

A small study posted in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that participants struggled to estimate how many calories they burned in a workout and how much they could eat to replenish those calories burned. 50 adults and 49 children were asked to choose the size of chocolate and how much of a sports drink they believed their one-hour workout would allow them to consume. The majority of participants selected a piece of chocolate and sports drink that was half the size of what their workout would allow them to eat or drink. The study's findings show that not only do people not understand how many calories their workout will burn, they also don't understand the number of calories in food or beverages simply by looking at the product. Senior author Craig Williams pointed out that in many cases, participants underestimated the number of calories in the chocolate and sports drink because they believed it was the correct answer, but they also would eat more than what they had indicated in the study.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, online July 1, 2015
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2015


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