Newsletter Archives > ChiroPlanet.com Monthly Health Newsletter: May 2018 Health Newsletter

May 2018 Health Newsletter


Current Articles

» ALPHA LIPOIC ACID
» Study Proves Chiropractic Care Minimizes Opioid Dependence
» Rear-Facing Car Seats Increase Child Safety During Real-Impact Collisions
» Active Kids Think Better

ALPHA LIPOIC ACID
Alpha-Lipoic Acid

What is alpha-lipoic acid? Why do we need it?

Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is an antioxidant manufactured in the body. It is sometimes referred to as the ?universal? antioxidant because, unlike most antioxidants, it is soluble in both fat and water. In addition to being manufactured by the body, it can be found in some foods and supplements (see below).

ALA has several benefits, particularly for people with diabetes. It enhances glucose uptake in people with type-2 diabetes, inhibits the process of glybosylation (in which sugar molecules attach themselves to proteins), and can reduce nerve damage and pain caused by diabetes. Preliminary evidence suggests that ALA can improve visual function in people with glaucoma. Test-tube studies show that ALA can stop the HIV virus from replicating, but whether ALA supplements can help people infected with HIV remains unclear at this point.

How much alpha-lipoic acid should I take?

As of this writing, there is no clear evidence that any particular dose of ALA provides a benefit for any particular condition. In the abovementioned glaucoma study, researchers provided subjects with 150 mg of ALA per day. Other studies typically use between 750 and 800 mg per day. Some practitioners recommend 20-50 mg of alpha-lipoic acid daily to provide general antioxidant protection.

What are some good sources of alpha-lipoic acid? What forms are available?

Small amounts of alpha-lipoic acid are produced naturally by the body. Some red meats ? particularly liver ? are believed to be good sources of ALA; supplements are also available.

What can happen if I don't get enough alpha-lipoic acid? What can happen if I take too much? Are there any side-effects I should be aware of?

Because alpha-lipoic acid is produced naturally in the body, deficiencies are not known to occur in humans. However, for people who take large doses of ALA supplements, some side-effects may occur, including skin rash, and diabetics run the risk of suffering hypoglycemia. Long-term use of alpha-lipoic acid in animals has been shown to interfere with the actions of the vitamin biotin, but research on humans has yet to be conducted.

As always, make sure to consult with a licensed health care provider before you begin taking alpha-lipoic acid or any other herbal remedy or dietary supplement.


References

  • Busse E, Zimmer G, Schorpohl B, et al. Influence of alpha-lipoic acid on intracellular glutathione in vitro and in vivo.Arzneimittelforschung1992;42:829-31.
  • Filina AA, Davydova NG, Endrikhovskii SN, et al. Lipoic acid as a means of metabolic therapy of open-angle glaucoma.Vestn Oftalmol1995;111:6-8.
  • Lykkesfeldt J, Hagen TM, Vinarsky V, et al. Age-associated decline in ascorbic acid concentration, recycling, and biosynthesis in rat hepatocytes - reversal with (R)-alpha-lipoic acid supplementation.FASEB J1998;12:1183-9.
  • Nichols TW Jr. Alpha-lipoic acid: biological effects and clinical implications.Altern Med Rev1997;2:177-83.
  • Packer L, Witt EH, Tritschler HJ. Alpha-lipoic acid as a biological antioxidant.Free Radic Biol Med1995;19:227-50.

Author: Nichols
Source: TYH
Copyright: TYH 1997


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Study Proves Chiropractic Care Minimizes Opioid Dependence

The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine has published a study that formalizes the efficacy of chiropractic care in reducing opioid usage among adults with low back pain. The study, which included over 13,000 adults, found that patients receiving chiropractic care for low back pain (LBP) filled opioid analgesic prescriptions 55 percent less often than those not receiving chiropractic care. Overall, the research indicated chiropractic pain management practices can reduce or eliminate the need for opioid pain relievers, resulting in fewer risks and reduced patient costs. Key findings included:

  • Only 19 percent of patients under chiropractic care filled prescriptions for opioids in contrast to the subjects not under chiropractic care, of which 35 percent filled opioid prescriptions.
  • When considering all types of prescriptions, the group under chiropractic care filled significantly fewer prescriptions than the non-chiropractic care group. 

With over 2 million people in the U.S. suffering from opioid addiction and 15% of the population fearing addiction to opioids, finding safe and cost-effective methods of managing pain is critical. Chiropractic care, along with other drug-free therapies, has been recommended by the Institute of Medicine to treat patients presenting with chronic pain. Guidelines from the American College of Physicians are even more explicit on recommendations for treating back pain, clarifying non-pharmacologic treatment as the primary choice. Opioids are considered as a last resort only, or in cases where patients’ complicating factors make other options incompatible. If you’re suffering from back pain, contact a chiropractic near you to help manage your pain safely, effectively, and without drugs.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. doi:10.1089/acm.2017.0131
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2018


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Rear-Facing Car Seats Increase Child Safety During Real-Impact Collisions

Until recently, the call for rear-facing carseats has been predicated on results garnered from side-impact and head-on accidents, which are deadliest. However, a rear-impact collision has potential to cause head-and-neck injuries in infants and toddlers when the back-and-forth motion of the impact causes a whiplash effect. Experts agree that infants and toddlers should remain seated in rear-facing carseats until they’ve reached the age of two or until they’re too big to be positioned correctly for maximum front- and side-impact protection. A new study by Julie Mansfield of the Injury Biomechanics Research Center of Wexner Medical Center now proves this rear-facing position is protective even when the car is impacted from behind. The study used a crash-test dummy to demonstrate how crash energy is absorbed through the rear-facing seat to keep the child’s head, neck, and spine safely aligned. Employing four of the most commonly-used U.S. carseats, the study recreated a series of rear-impact collisions that found all four carseats, when used in the rear-facing position, allowed the crash energy to travel through the carseat and vehicle seat, reducing crash forces on the child’s body. In this scenario, the child is cradled by the seat, allowing the energy of the crash to be distributed evenly over the child’s back. Because the carseat and child move as one unit, the head and spine remain supported. These results should assure parents that keeping their children in rear-facing seats for as long as possible is the best way to protect them from injuries sustained in any collision scenario.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: SAE International, online April 3, 2018.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2018


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Active Kids Think Better


According to researchers, children who participate in moderate to vigorous physical activity not only benefit physically, they also improve their cognitive performance and brain function. Results from a new study involving 221 children aged 7 to 9 show regular participation in moderate to vigorous physical activity increases their ability to block out distractions, increase focus and improve their multi-tasking skills. U.S. and European exercise guidelines for children and teens currently call for a minimum of 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per day. If you're a parent with a child or teen, encourage and assist them in becoming and staying physically active. Enroll them in after school programs that involve physical activity. Get them into a sports league. Join the YMCA. Take them to the park. Play in the back yard. Be safe but definitely be active!


Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Pediatrics, online September 29, 2014.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2014


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