Newsletter Archives > ChiroPlanet.com Monthly Health Newsletter: July 2018 Health Newsletter

July 2018 Health Newsletter


Current Articles

» ALPHA LIPOIC ACID
» Chiropractic - Your Safe Option for Pain
» Why Older Women Should Eat Their Vegetables

ALPHA LIPOIC ACID
Alpha-Lipoic Acid

What is alpha-lipoic acid? Why do we need it?

Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is an antioxidant manufactured in the body. It is sometimes referred to as the ?universal? antioxidant because, unlike most antioxidants, it is soluble in both fat and water. In addition to being manufactured by the body, it can be found in some foods and supplements (see below).

ALA has several benefits, particularly for people with diabetes. It enhances glucose uptake in people with type-2 diabetes, inhibits the process of glybosylation (in which sugar molecules attach themselves to proteins), and can reduce nerve damage and pain caused by diabetes. Preliminary evidence suggests that ALA can improve visual function in people with glaucoma. Test-tube studies show that ALA can stop the HIV virus from replicating, but whether ALA supplements can help people infected with HIV remains unclear at this point.

How much alpha-lipoic acid should I take?

As of this writing, there is no clear evidence that any particular dose of ALA provides a benefit for any particular condition. In the abovementioned glaucoma study, researchers provided subjects with 150 mg of ALA per day. Other studies typically use between 750 and 800 mg per day. Some practitioners recommend 20-50 mg of alpha-lipoic acid daily to provide general antioxidant protection.

What are some good sources of alpha-lipoic acid? What forms are available?

Small amounts of alpha-lipoic acid are produced naturally by the body. Some red meats ? particularly liver ? are believed to be good sources of ALA; supplements are also available.

What can happen if I don't get enough alpha-lipoic acid? What can happen if I take too much? Are there any side-effects I should be aware of?

Because alpha-lipoic acid is produced naturally in the body, deficiencies are not known to occur in humans. However, for people who take large doses of ALA supplements, some side-effects may occur, including skin rash, and diabetics run the risk of suffering hypoglycemia. Long-term use of alpha-lipoic acid in animals has been shown to interfere with the actions of the vitamin biotin, but research on humans has yet to be conducted.

As always, make sure to consult with a licensed health care provider before you begin taking alpha-lipoic acid or any other herbal remedy or dietary supplement.


References

  • Busse E, Zimmer G, Schorpohl B, et al. Influence of alpha-lipoic acid on intracellular glutathione in vitro and in vivo.Arzneimittelforschung1992;42:829-31.
  • Filina AA, Davydova NG, Endrikhovskii SN, et al. Lipoic acid as a means of metabolic therapy of open-angle glaucoma.Vestn Oftalmol1995;111:6-8.
  • Lykkesfeldt J, Hagen TM, Vinarsky V, et al. Age-associated decline in ascorbic acid concentration, recycling, and biosynthesis in rat hepatocytes - reversal with (R)-alpha-lipoic acid supplementation.FASEB J1998;12:1183-9.
  • Nichols TW Jr. Alpha-lipoic acid: biological effects and clinical implications.Altern Med Rev1997;2:177-83.
  • Packer L, Witt EH, Tritschler HJ. Alpha-lipoic acid as a biological antioxidant.Free Radic Biol Med1995;19:227-50.

Author: Nichols
Source: TYH
Copyright: TYH 1997


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Chiropractic - Your Safe Option for Pain

Pain is a serious issue for many people. In fact, 25.3 million people in the U.S. suffer from chronic pain. The bigger problem is what can happen if you turn to over-the-counter or prescription drugs to get relief. Fortunately, chiropractic care is as effective as pain medication in managing sustained pain syndromes, and it eliminates the side effects and risk associated with short and long-term use of medicine. Letís walk through some steps that demonstrate how chiropractic care works effectively. Recent research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen, and other common pain relievers are better than opioids in providing relief of recurrent pain in the back, knees, and hips. NSAIDs also help increase patientsí ability to perform daily activities like going to work, talking a walk, or sleeping soundly.† So, you can be safer by relying on NSAIDs over opioids. However, another study appearing in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed that spinal manipulation by a qualified chiropractor over six weeks reduced back pain and improved function as much as NSAIDs, but without risks normally associated with over-the-counter or prescription pain relievers. Following this logic, chiropractic care remains one of the safest, most effective options to consider when seeking treatment for back pain. Non-invasive, simple, and drug-free, chiropractic is a great way to manage pain and improve mobility so you can return to normal daily life as quickly as possible. To discuss options, contact a doctor of chiropractic near you and get treated today.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: .
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2018


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Why Older Women Should Eat Their Vegetables

An Australian study of 954 women aged 70 and older has found that the more vegetables older women eat, the less likely they are to develop plaque accumulation in their arteries. Lauren Blekkenhorst, a nutrition researcher at the University of Western Australia and lead author of the study, found that study participants averaged 2.7 servings of vegetables per day. Using a food questionnaire to categorize responses, researchers determined that women who consumed three servings of vegetables per day had artery walls that were about 5 percent less thick than women who ate less than two servings. One of the most beneficial types of vegetables for artery health was found to be the crucifer family ó cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and broccoli. For each third of an ounce more cruciferous vegetables participants ate, they had a corresponding 0.8 percent less artery wall thickness. This means even a small increase in vegetable consumption can have big benefits for vascular health. Blekkenhorst hypothesizes that eating vegetables may make arteries healthier because it leaves less room for junk food. In addition, the vitamins and minerals present in vegetables have been shown to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation, which can lead to better cardiovascular health. Although the study was not meant to predict long-term cardiovascular health, it does show how easily your diet impacts vascular health. Adding just a serving or two of vegetables to your diet each day can make help you stay healthier, longer.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Journal of the American Heart Association, online April 4, 2018.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2018


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