July 2019 Health Newsletter

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DELRAN CHIROPRACTIC, PA

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   Dr Richard Polino DC, DACNB, FICC
   Dr Jason Polino   DC
   Dr John Sinibaldi DC
         A Holistic Health Care Center
         www.polinowellness.com
         www.delrandiscdr.com

856-461-6262  
3001 Bridgeboro Road

DELRAN, NEW JERSEY, 08075



Current Articles

» ALPHA LIPOIC ACID
» Bill Introduced to Modernize Medicare Coverage of Chiropractic Services
» Chiropractic Care - Not Just For Back Problems
» Stay Cool For Better Exercise Performance and Safety

ALPHA LIPOIC ACID

Alpha-Lipoic Acid

What is alpha-lipoic acid? Why do we need it?

Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is an antioxidant manufactured in the body. It is sometimes referred to as the ?universal? antioxidant because, unlike most antioxidants, it is soluble in both fat and water. In addition to being manufactured by the body, it can be found in some foods and supplements (see below).

ALA has several benefits, particularly for people with diabetes. It enhances glucose uptake in people with type-2 diabetes, inhibits the process of glybosylation (in which sugar molecules attach themselves to proteins), and can reduce nerve damage and pain caused by diabetes. Preliminary evidence suggests that ALA can improve visual function in people with glaucoma. Test-tube studies show that ALA can stop the HIV virus from replicating, but whether ALA supplements can help people infected with HIV remains unclear at this point.

How much alpha-lipoic acid should I take?

As of this writing, there is no clear evidence that any particular dose of ALA provides a benefit for any particular condition. In the abovementioned glaucoma study, researchers provided subjects with 150 mg of ALA per day. Other studies typically use between 750 and 800 mg per day. Some practitioners recommend 20-50 mg of alpha-lipoic acid daily to provide general antioxidant protection.

What are some good sources of alpha-lipoic acid? What forms are available?

Small amounts of alpha-lipoic acid are produced naturally by the body. Some red meats ? particularly liver ? are believed to be good sources of ALA; supplements are also available.

What can happen if I don't get enough alpha-lipoic acid? What can happen if I take too much? Are there any side-effects I should be aware of?

Because alpha-lipoic acid is produced naturally in the body, deficiencies are not known to occur in humans. However, for people who take large doses of ALA supplements, some side-effects may occur, including skin rash, and diabetics run the risk of suffering hypoglycemia. Long-term use of alpha-lipoic acid in animals has been shown to interfere with the actions of the vitamin biotin, but research on humans has yet to be conducted.

As always, make sure to consult with a licensed health care provider before you begin taking alpha-lipoic acid or any other herbal remedy or dietary supplement.


References

  • Busse E, Zimmer G, Schorpohl B, et al. Influence of alpha-lipoic acid on intracellular glutathione in vitro and in vivo.Arzneimittelforschung1992;42:829-31.
  • Filina AA, Davydova NG, Endrikhovskii SN, et al. Lipoic acid as a means of metabolic therapy of open-angle glaucoma.Vestn Oftalmol1995;111:6-8.
  • Lykkesfeldt J, Hagen TM, Vinarsky V, et al. Age-associated decline in ascorbic acid concentration, recycling, and biosynthesis in rat hepatocytes - reversal with (R)-alpha-lipoic acid supplementation.FASEB J1998;12:1183-9.
  • Nichols TW Jr. Alpha-lipoic acid: biological effects and clinical implications.Altern Med Rev1997;2:177-83.
  • Packer L, Witt EH, Tritschler HJ. Alpha-lipoic acid as a biological antioxidant.Free Radic Biol Med1995;19:227-50.

Author: Nichols
Source: TYH
Copyright: TYH 1997


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Bill Introduced to Modernize Medicare Coverage of Chiropractic Services

A bill that would update Medicare by increasing its coverage of services provided by doctors of chiropractic within the full extent of their licensure was introduced today in the U.S. House of Representatives.  The legislation, H.R. 3654, known as the Chiropractic Medicare Coverage Modernization Act of 2019, would align Medicare’s coverage of chiropractic services with that of other federal health care providers as well as many private health plans.  The bipartisan legislation, introduced by Reps. Brian Higgins (D-N.Y.) and Tom Reed (R-N.Y.), would enable beneficiaries to more easily access the chiropractic profession’s broad-based, non-drug approach to pain management, which includes Medicare-covered services such as manual manipulation of the spine and extremities, evaluation and management services, diagnostic imaging  and utilization of other non-drug approaches that have become an important strategy in national efforts to stem the epidemic of prescription opioid overuse and abuse.  "The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) is encouraged that this bill would finally give Medicare beneficiaries access to the same safe and effective chiropractic services that members of our military, veterans, and federal employees now enjoy," said ACA President Robert C. Jones, DC.  "We applaud Rep. Higgins and Rep. Reed, who recognize the necessity of modernizing Medicare's chiropractic coverage to meet the needs of today's beneficiaries," added Keith Overland, DC, chairman of the ACA Legislative Advisory Board.  Since 1972, Medicare beneficiaries have been covered for only one chiropractic service—manual manipulation of the spine—forcing them to access additional medically necessary care from other types of providers or to pay out of pocket for the services from their chiropractor.  Chiropractors are the only physician-level providers in the Medicare program whose services are restricted in this manner.  The federal Medicare program currently serves more than 55 million individuals; various projections forecast the number of people age 65 or older increasing by about one-third over the next decade.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Acatoday.com July 9, 2019.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2019


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Chiropractic Care - Not Just For Back Problems

Chiropractors have always maintained that chiropractic care is not just for the treatment of back and neck pain, but is in fact effective for other conditions issues as well. A new case study, published in the Journal of Chiropractic Medicine backs these claims by examining the treatment of arm and hand pain. A 41-year-old female patient was experiencing alarming pain, numbness and weakness in her right arm and hand. Her symptoms had begun three weeks prior to treatment, when she woke up in the morning and assumed she had “slept wrong.” Medical assessments confirmed her pain, numbness and decreased grip strength. Treatment began immediately and included specific chiropractic manipulative therapy as well as myofascial therapy and elastic therapeutic taping. The patient was also assigned an active home care regimen which included postural exercises and workstation ergonomics education. The results—The patient showed immediate improvement of her numbness and weakness after just the first treatment. The case study’s authors noted that over a series of eleven treatments, her symptoms were completely resolved and she was able to return to work without pain. If you’re experiencing any sort of body pain, numbness or loss of strength, contact your local chiropractor today. Consultations are affordable, safe and chances are very good that chiropractic care may be able to help!

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Journal of Chiropractic Medicine. Volume 12, Issue 2; June 2013.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2013


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Stay Cool For Better Exercise Performance and Safety

As the temperature rises so too does the risk for exercise related heat stroke and performance drop. The human body doesn't perform optimally when it becomes too hot. New research shows that using cooling techniques such as ice vests or cold water bathing/applications before and/or during workouts increases performance. Your body requires significant energy and blood flow to keep your body from overheating. Any external assistance with the cooling process provides the body with additional energy and blood flow to exercising muscles. Various cooling methods were studied including the use of cooling vests and cold packs, consumption of cold water or ice slurries, immersion in a cold water bath or a combination. Researchers also studied the effects on performance comparing pre-exercise applications vs. during exercise applications. Researchers found while pre-exercise and during exercise applications of cold increased performance, a combination of the two worked best. One of the most effective applications was wearing an ice chest during exercise along with a combination of pre-exercise techniques. Doing so improved athletic performance by close to 7 percent. In addition to the increased performance, cooling techniques reduce potential for heat stroke - a very common side effect of exercise, especially in the summer heat.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: British Journal of Sports Medicine, online April 19, 2014.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2014


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