October 2020 Health Newsletter

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DELRAN CHIROPRACTIC, PA

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   Dr Richard Polino DC, DACNB, FICC
   Dr Jason Polino   DC
   Dr John Sinibaldi DC
         A Holistic Health Care Center
         www.polinowellness.com
         www.delrandiscdr.com

856-461-6262  
3001 Bridgeboro Road

DELRAN, NEW JERSEY, 08075



Current Articles

» ALPHA LIPOIC ACID
» Get 'Active and Adaptive' During National Chiropractic Health Month
» Cardiovascular Health May Begin with Breakfast
» Women: Want to Avoid Heart Failure? Try Walking

ALPHA LIPOIC ACID

Alpha-Lipoic Acid

What is alpha-lipoic acid? Why do we need it?

Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is an antioxidant manufactured in the body. It is sometimes referred to as the ?universal? antioxidant because, unlike most antioxidants, it is soluble in both fat and water. In addition to being manufactured by the body, it can be found in some foods and supplements (see below).

ALA has several benefits, particularly for people with diabetes. It enhances glucose uptake in people with type-2 diabetes, inhibits the process of glybosylation (in which sugar molecules attach themselves to proteins), and can reduce nerve damage and pain caused by diabetes. Preliminary evidence suggests that ALA can improve visual function in people with glaucoma. Test-tube studies show that ALA can stop the HIV virus from replicating, but whether ALA supplements can help people infected with HIV remains unclear at this point.

How much alpha-lipoic acid should I take?

As of this writing, there is no clear evidence that any particular dose of ALA provides a benefit for any particular condition. In the abovementioned glaucoma study, researchers provided subjects with 150 mg of ALA per day. Other studies typically use between 750 and 800 mg per day. Some practitioners recommend 20-50 mg of alpha-lipoic acid daily to provide general antioxidant protection.

What are some good sources of alpha-lipoic acid? What forms are available?

Small amounts of alpha-lipoic acid are produced naturally by the body. Some red meats ? particularly liver ? are believed to be good sources of ALA; supplements are also available.

What can happen if I don't get enough alpha-lipoic acid? What can happen if I take too much? Are there any side-effects I should be aware of?

Because alpha-lipoic acid is produced naturally in the body, deficiencies are not known to occur in humans. However, for people who take large doses of ALA supplements, some side-effects may occur, including skin rash, and diabetics run the risk of suffering hypoglycemia. Long-term use of alpha-lipoic acid in animals has been shown to interfere with the actions of the vitamin biotin, but research on humans has yet to be conducted.

As always, make sure to consult with a licensed health care provider before you begin taking alpha-lipoic acid or any other herbal remedy or dietary supplement.


References

  • Busse E, Zimmer G, Schorpohl B, et al. Influence of alpha-lipoic acid on intracellular glutathione in vitro and in vivo.Arzneimittelforschung1992;42:829-31.
  • Filina AA, Davydova NG, Endrikhovskii SN, et al. Lipoic acid as a means of metabolic therapy of open-angle glaucoma.Vestn Oftalmol1995;111:6-8.
  • Lykkesfeldt J, Hagen TM, Vinarsky V, et al. Age-associated decline in ascorbic acid concentration, recycling, and biosynthesis in rat hepatocytes - reversal with (R)-alpha-lipoic acid supplementation.FASEB J1998;12:1183-9.
  • Nichols TW Jr. Alpha-lipoic acid: biological effects and clinical implications.Altern Med Rev1997;2:177-83.
  • Packer L, Witt EH, Tritschler HJ. Alpha-lipoic acid as a biological antioxidant.Free Radic Biol Med1995;19:227-50.

Author: Nichols
Source: TYH


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Get 'Active and Adaptive' During National Chiropractic Health Month

During this October's National Chiropractic Health Month (NCHM), the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) and chiropractors nationwide are encouraging the public to get "active and adaptive" to maintain their musculoskeletal health and function in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.  Since March, many people have incorporated changes into their daily routines to reduce their potential exposure to the novel coronavirus: avoiding crowded public spaces, working from home, forgoing air travel for long car trips, ordering food and supplies online, and avoiding gyms and health clubs.  Because of this new normal, many are moving less and experiencing musculoskeletal pain.  Polls conducted by ACA confirm that chiropractors are seeing an increase in musculoskeletal conditions such as back pain, neck pain, and headaches since the beginning of the pandemic. When asked what they believe is contributing most to these conditions, ACA members cite lack of movement, stress and poor posture as key factors.  During NCHM, chiropractors are encouraging the public to choose healthy ways to adapt to the new normal by getting enough movement during the day, being aware of posture and ways to improve it, getting adequate rest, and managing stress naturally.  Learn more by visiting Hands Down Better and follow the conversation on social media with the hashtag #ActiveAdaptive.  "Inactivity has been a growing problem worldwide, even before the pandemic.  While the coronavirus may limit our options, finding ways to incorporate more physical activity, as well as improved posture, throughout the day can benefit our health now and into the future," said ACA President Robert C. Jones, DC.  National Chiropractic Health Month (NCHM) is a nationwide observance held each October.  NCHM educates the public about the importance of musculoskeletal health and raises awareness of the benefits of chiropractic care and its natural, patient-centered and drug-free approach to pain management, health and wellness.

Author: American Chiropractic Association
Source: Acatoday.org, September 9, 2020.


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Cardiovascular Health May Begin with Breakfast

There are several ways to lower the risks of heart attack, cardiovascular disease, blood vessel diseases, and stroke. Although it is important to watch the kind of food that goes into the body, many studies have shown that it may be equally as important to pay attention to the timing of meals. Here are three ways to boost cardiovascular health:
1. Meal Planning. According to a statement released by the American Heart Association, planning the meals and snacks that you have throughout the day can help lower the risks of cardiovascular disease. This is due to the metabolic rates of the body throughout the day.
2. Eating Breakfast Daily. Several studies have found correlations between increased cardiovascular health and people who consume breakfast regularly. There is a much lower risk of high cholesterol and high blood pressure associated with those who consume breakfast daily.
3. Lowering Food Consumption in the Evening. At night it is harder for the body to digest and process various foods. Many studies have shown that this may be due to a decreased metabolic rate in the evening. For this reason, lowering the amount of food eaten in the evening can lead to better cardiovascular health.
Using these methods to carefully plan meals and snacks for each day can help reduce the many risk factors surrounding cardiovascular disease including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, and insulin complications such as insulin resistance.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Circulation, online January 30, 2017.


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Women: Want to Avoid Heart Failure? Try Walking

New research suggests that women who exercise regularly, including walking, may lower their risk for heart failure. The study from researchers at the University of Buffalo in New York looked at over 137,000 women aged 50-79, of which over one-third had high blood pressure and other heart disease risk factors such as smoking and diabetes. After a follow-up period of 14 years, researchers found that the women who got some form of physical activity were less likely to suffer from heart failure (11%). Women with the highest levels of physical activity, meanwhile, were the least likely to suffer from heart failure (35%), as compared to women who got no exercise at all. In addition, women who got the most physical activity were the least likely to develop a sub-type of heart failure called reduced ejection fraction (32%) as compared to women who never exercised. 33% of the same group of women were also the least likely to develop another sub-type of heart failure called a preserved ejection fraction. One of the biggest findings from the study, however, is that walking works just as well as other forms of exercise, including more vigorous types. To discover how much exercise the women got, researchers studied answers to a questionnaire about exercise that every participant completed. As it turns out, walking was the most common type of physical activity reported.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JACC: Heart Failure, online September 5, 2018.


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