January 2020 Health Newsletter

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DELRAN CHIROPRACTIC, PA

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   Dr Richard Polino DC, DACNB, FICC
   Dr Jason Polino   DC
   Dr John Sinibaldi DC
         A Holistic Health Care Center
         www.polinowellness.com
         www.delrandiscdr.com

856-461-6262  
3001 Bridgeboro Road

DELRAN, NEW JERSEY, 08075



Current Articles

» ALPHA LIPOIC ACID
» Manual Therapy Providers Forge Closer Ties at Interprofessional Collaborative Spine Conference
» Screen Time and Inactivity Unacceptable In Adolescents
» Chiropractic - Safe and Sound
» How Pillow Height Affects Muscle Activity and Perceived Comfort

ALPHA LIPOIC ACID

Alpha-Lipoic Acid

What is alpha-lipoic acid? Why do we need it?

Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is an antioxidant manufactured in the body. It is sometimes referred to as the ?universal? antioxidant because, unlike most antioxidants, it is soluble in both fat and water. In addition to being manufactured by the body, it can be found in some foods and supplements (see below).

ALA has several benefits, particularly for people with diabetes. It enhances glucose uptake in people with type-2 diabetes, inhibits the process of glybosylation (in which sugar molecules attach themselves to proteins), and can reduce nerve damage and pain caused by diabetes. Preliminary evidence suggests that ALA can improve visual function in people with glaucoma. Test-tube studies show that ALA can stop the HIV virus from replicating, but whether ALA supplements can help people infected with HIV remains unclear at this point.

How much alpha-lipoic acid should I take?

As of this writing, there is no clear evidence that any particular dose of ALA provides a benefit for any particular condition. In the abovementioned glaucoma study, researchers provided subjects with 150 mg of ALA per day. Other studies typically use between 750 and 800 mg per day. Some practitioners recommend 20-50 mg of alpha-lipoic acid daily to provide general antioxidant protection.

What are some good sources of alpha-lipoic acid? What forms are available?

Small amounts of alpha-lipoic acid are produced naturally by the body. Some red meats ? particularly liver ? are believed to be good sources of ALA; supplements are also available.

What can happen if I don't get enough alpha-lipoic acid? What can happen if I take too much? Are there any side-effects I should be aware of?

Because alpha-lipoic acid is produced naturally in the body, deficiencies are not known to occur in humans. However, for people who take large doses of ALA supplements, some side-effects may occur, including skin rash, and diabetics run the risk of suffering hypoglycemia. Long-term use of alpha-lipoic acid in animals has been shown to interfere with the actions of the vitamin biotin, but research on humans has yet to be conducted.

As always, make sure to consult with a licensed health care provider before you begin taking alpha-lipoic acid or any other herbal remedy or dietary supplement.


References

  • Busse E, Zimmer G, Schorpohl B, et al. Influence of alpha-lipoic acid on intracellular glutathione in vitro and in vivo.Arzneimittelforschung1992;42:829-31.
  • Filina AA, Davydova NG, Endrikhovskii SN, et al. Lipoic acid as a means of metabolic therapy of open-angle glaucoma.Vestn Oftalmol1995;111:6-8.
  • Lykkesfeldt J, Hagen TM, Vinarsky V, et al. Age-associated decline in ascorbic acid concentration, recycling, and biosynthesis in rat hepatocytes - reversal with (R)-alpha-lipoic acid supplementation.FASEB J1998;12:1183-9.
  • Nichols TW Jr. Alpha-lipoic acid: biological effects and clinical implications.Altern Med Rev1997;2:177-83.
  • Packer L, Witt EH, Tritschler HJ. Alpha-lipoic acid as a biological antioxidant.Free Radic Biol Med1995;19:227-50.

Author: Nichols
Source: TYH


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Manual Therapy Providers Forge Closer Ties at Interprofessional Collaborative Spine Conference

More than 160 members of the chiropractic, physical therapy and osteopathic professions forged a new spirit of cooperation and understanding during the Interprofessional Collaborative Spine Conference (ICSC), which took place Nov. 8-9 in Pittsburgh, Pa.  Organizers of this first-of-its-kind event hope to enhance patient outcomes as well as increase integration of manual therapies for back pain in the wake of the ongoing opioid crisis.  ICSC was organized and hosted by the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) with the support of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists (AAOMPT) and the Academy of Orthopaedic Physical Therapy (AOPT), which represent three of the major provider groups of non-drug manual therapies for pain.     Manual therapies such as spinal manipulation, physical therapy modalities, massage and acupuncture have received increased attention and support in recent years by major health care organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Family Physicians for their ability to effectively manage many cases of back pain and in some cases reduce or alleviate the need for prescription opioids.  Research shows that back pain is one of the most common conditions for which opioids are prescribed.  "The chiropractic profession was honored to take part in the Interprofessional Collaborative Spine Conference," said Michele Maiers, DC, MPH, PhD, vice president of the American Chiropractic Association. "We are committed to working together with our colleagues in physical therapy and osteopathy to raise awareness and promote integration of non-drug manual approaches."  "Providers of manual therapies have an unprecedented opportunity to positively impact the lives of millions of people who struggle with back pain. Together, we can find ways to improve what we do and to communicate better with patients.  The Interprofessional Collaborative Spine Conference was an important step in that direction," said Julie Fritz, PT, PhD, FAPTA, associate dean for research at the University of Utah College of Health, who helped plan the conference.

Author: American Chiropractic Association.
Source: Acatoday.com. November 12, 2019.


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Screen Time and Inactivity Unacceptable In Adolescents

According to research conducted by the World Health Organization (WHO), the majority of adolescents are not getting adequate amounts of physical activity.  The WHO recommends adolescents participate in an hour of moderate to vigorous physical activity daily.  However, data obtained by the WHO from 1.6 million students between 2001 and 2016 found only 1 out of 5 children met the WHO’s recommendation for daily physical activity.  The WHO attributes this lack of physical activity to increase in home screen time which is replacing the time for physical activity.  While the data is extremely concerning and parents and educational leaders need to step up to create and implement solutions, the good news is that over the 15 years reviewed, the physical activity for boys has actually improved.  Unfortunately, over that same period of time, there has been no improvement for the physical activity in girls.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health. November 21, 2019.


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Chiropractic - Safe and Sound

Every once in a while someone makes a comment suggesting chiropractic care might not be completely safe. They may claim that chiropractic care to the neck region might have associated risks of stroke. Make no mistake - chiropractic care is actually one of the most natural, safe and least invasive forms of health care available. Doctors of chiropractic are trained extensively to deliver their care in a safe, natural and non-invasive manner. Not only have millions of patients experienced the safety and effectiveness chiropractic care has to offer, numerous studies in existence back this up. One of the most recently published safety related studies evaluated the incidence of strokes in approximately 1.16 million 66 to 99 year old Medicare beneficiaries following visits to medical doctors vs. visits to doctors of chiropractic. Ironically according to researchers, their findings indicated that 7 days after their visits slightly more beneficiaries who visited a medical doctor as compared to a doctor of chiropractic ended up suffering from a stroke.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JMPT. February 2015 Volume 38, Issue 2, Pages 93–101.


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How Pillow Height Affects Muscle Activity and Perceived Comfort

A recent report studied how using foam pillows of three different heights affected the comfort and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the neck and mid-upper back muscles of participants. The study was performed by a team of therapists and researchers in the University of São Paulo School of Medicine in São Paulo, Brazil. Performed in 2014 and published in 2015, the study revealed the associations among pillow height, EMG activity, and perceived comfort. Twenty-one asymptomatic adults were observed using three different foam pillows of 5 cm, 10 cm and 14 cm, or approximately 2 inches, 4 inches and 5 1/2 inches. Study participants rated their comfort using a 100-mm visual analog scale, while researchers calculated EMG activity of the neck and mid-upper back muscles, called the sternocleidomastoid and upper and middle trapezius muscles. Participants considered height 1 (approximately 2 inches) to be the least comfortable and height 2 (approximately 4 inches) the most comfortable. In addition, all muscle groups showed statistical differences in EMG activity between heights 1 and 2, but not between heights 2 and 3. Individuals who prefer sleeping with a flat pillow may want to think twice, as a four-inch pillow may be the best choice for perceived comfort and back and neck support.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JMPT. Volume 38, Issue 6, Pages 375-381.


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